Most amazing archeological sites in Spain

Roman temple ©Rafael dP fotos/Flickr

Roman temple ©Rafael dP fotos/Flickr

With lots of architectural wonders and a millennial history, Spain makes a brilliant destination for anyone interested to explore the country’s past. The great thing about Spain is that, in addition to its medieval castles and Gothic cathedrals, it is also home to numerous archeological sites, uncovering entire Roman cities, or going even further into the past, when prehistoric men used to live in caves. So let’s see where to find the most amazing archeological sites in Spain and what they have to offer:

Altamira Cave

The Altamira Cave in Northern Spain, near the city of Santander, is home to one of the oldest and most precious art pieces in the world. The prehistoric humans living in these cages have filled the cave’s walls with elaborate (for those times) depictions of animals. Some consider the Altamira Cave to be one of the greatest discoveries in history, as it allowed researchers to learn about the lives of humans thousands of years ago. There is just one problem here: for better conservation, visits to the cave are restricted, so it might take years of waiting until you finally get in.

Aqueduct of Segovia

As you probably know very well, the current territory of Spain was once a flourishing Roman province. This is why Roman ruins can be found in many parts of Spain, but few were more beautifully preserved or more impressive than the aqueduct in Segovia. This 2000 year old construction still stands today, stretching for approximately 18 kilometers across the hills of Segovia.

Segovia aqueduct ©rubenvike/Flickr

Segovia aqueduct ©rubenvike/Flickr

Merida

The town of Merida is home to one of the most impressive Roman theaters discovered so far. After careful restoration, this elaborate stone construction can now be admired in all its glory. Archeologists consider that, at its construction in the 1st century BC, the theater could accommodate  around 6000 people – an incredible number even for today’s theater halls. The theater is part of the larger Archeological Ensemble of Merida, which contains numerous other ruins, such as temples, bridges, aqueducts and triumphal arches.

Roman temple ©Rafael dP fotos/Flickr

Roman temple ©Rafael dP fotos/Flickr

Atapuerca

Atapuerca might not be the most famous place in Spain, yet few people know that this is the cradle of European civilization. The oldest signs of human activity have been traced in the caves of Atapuerca, which allegedly go back to approximately 1 million years ago. The humans whose remains have been discovered where at a very early stage of civilizations – actually the Rock Age, if we judge by the stone tools around them.

early humans ©peru, lili eta marije/Flickr

early humans ©peru, lili eta marije/Flickr

 

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